Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What is this engine code? -OR- Can you tell me what this engine is?

A. The answer is more than likely on the site. All engine codes and casting numbers we know are posted on the site. If you don't see your engine code on the site we are sorry but we will more than likely not be able to tell you what it is either. We know that our engines codes for truck/van applications are not any where near complete. It is possible that if you don't see your engine code on our site that it is a truck/van engine code. Please don't email us asking us what an engine code is that you can't find on the site. If you email us with an engine code not found on the site then include the casting number and casting date off the back of the block or you will get a link to this FAQ as your answer. To decode your engine first check out Our Decoding help and also engine suffix code help (or see below for a copy of the same information) then go to our Chevy Engine Codes section to look it up.

We wish we had time to decode everyone's engine codes but we just don't so before emailing us asking us what an engine code is be sure to check the site. If you can't figure out what you have then send us the entire engine code, the casting number and the casting date (see decoding help) and we will be glad to help you research it. All three (engine code, casting # and casting date) are very important when trying to figure out what an engine is. Don't waist our time and yours sending us an email asking something like "I have engine suffix code CMJ can you tell me what it is?" The answer is sorry we can not.

Some Engine Suffix codes were used a number of times. For example suffix code "CMJ" was used in 1974 on a 350 and in 1980 on a 305. You need to look at the block casting date and casting number to narrow it down. Do not just rely on the suffix code to identify the original use of the block because it can be misleading in some cases. You should always look at ALL of the casting identifiers to determine exactly what engine you have.

ENGINE SUFFIX CODE HELP (copy)

The Engine Suffix Code is stamped on a block pad located immediately forward of the right hand or passenger side cylinder head picture here. The entire engine code contains the assembly plant, month (MM) and day (DD). See note below if your month or day code has a letter "I" instead of a number in it.

Engine Code Style Pre '70: F0114MB
F
01
14
MB

Assembly Plant

Assembly Month (MM) Assembly Day (DD)
Suffix

Engine Code Style '70 on: F0114CMB
F
01
14
C
MB

Assembly Plant

Assembly Month (MM) Assembly Day (DD) Motor Division
Suffix

Note: Some don't have a motor division for example.
F
01
14
UAF

Assembly Plant

Assembly Month (MM) Assembly Day (DD)
Suffix

Note about the letter "I" instead of a number "1" in the engine code for the date: Sometimes the number "1" looks like the letter "I" for the date codes. It is still a date code. All date codes are two digits, always, so if it looks like the letter "I" it is still the number "1". For example the actual stamped code may be "F0II4MB" but it really is "F0114MB".

Engine Assembly Plant Codes:   Motor Division:
F - Flint Motor Plant   C - Chevrolet passenger car
K - McKinnon   T - Chevrolet truck
M - GM of Mexico    
S - Signaw Service    
T - Tonawanda Engine Plant    
V - Flint Engine Plant    

Close to the engine suffix code is the partial VIN code. Partial VIN example:
"18U199887" decodes as "1"=Chevy, "8"=1968, "U"=Vehicle assembly plant Lordstown, Ohio and "199887"=last six digits of VIN.

VIN Assembly Plant Codes:  
(Continued)
A - Atlanta, Georgia   R - Arlington, Texas
B - Baltimore, Maryland   S - St. Louis, Missouri
C - Southgate, California   T - Tarrytown, New York
C - Atlanta, Georgia (Doraville) ('64 only)   U - Lordstown, Ohio
D - Atlanta, Georgia (Doraville)   U - Southgate, California ('64)
F - Flint, Michigan   W - Willow Run, Michigan
G - Framingham, Massachusetts   Y - Wilmington, Delaware
H - Fremont, California ('64 only)   Z - Fremont, California
J - Janesville, Wisconsin   0 - Oshawa, Canada ('65-'69)
K - Kansas City, Missouri   1 - Oshawa, Canada ('70-)
L - Los Angeles, California   1 - St. Therese, Canada ('67-'69)
N - Norwood, Ohio   2 - St. Therese, Canada ('70-)
O - Oakland, California    

Some of the Engine Suffix codes were used a number of times. For example suffix code "CMJ" was used in 1974 on a 350 and in 1980 on a 305. You need to look at the block casting date and casting number to narrow it down. Do not just rely on the suffix code to identify the original use of the block because it can be misleading in some cases. You should always look at ALL of the casting identifiers to determine exactly what engine you have.

"CE" or Crate engine information: CE123456

CE
123456

Crate Engine

Serial Number

Another type of stamping found on some blocks is the "CE" code. You might see something like this "CE123456" on the front pad of the block deck on the passenger side. The "CE" which has been known to stand for "Chevrolet Engine" or "Crate Engine" was used on blocks that were warranty replacement motors. The "CE" prefix was also used on "over the counter" blocks and engines. If a customer had problems with their original engine, while it was under warranty, it would have been replaced with an engine that was stamped "CE" with a number following it. The number following the "CE" code was the serial number for that particular engine. Also if someone purchased a new motor from the Chevrolet Parts counter, the front pad on the pasenger side of the block may have been stamped with a "CE" code.

A number of crate motors made by GM in Mexico, may have an "M" or "ML" prefix stamped into the front pad of the block followed by a series of numbers which is the serial number ofthat particular crate replacement motor. You may also see a raised casting on the block or heads of "Hecho en Mexico" which means "Made in Mexico". Many of the new GM crate motors are being made in Mexico. Later model crate engines, sold over the counter by Chevrolet or GM Performance Parts, may have different prefix code identifiers stamped in to the front pad on the block, such as "ZZ3" or three letter codes such as "XXA".

Target Master/Goodwrench crate motors will have a serial number something like "1M1234VB" or "1MO1234VP" or even "2M1234VB" or something along those lines. It is only a serial number. There is no way to decode the horsepower of the engine.

Other things to watch out for when decoding an engine block. If the block has previously been decked by a machine shop the engine assembly date and suffix codes may have been removed by the machining process. They are gone but they can be retrieved, just not easily. Some blocks have been restamped in order to create a "numbers matching" vehicle. With the increase in value of many "numbers matching" collector cars, some folks have restamped the blocks to deceive buyers. Again the original engine code can be retrieved. Be sure to check all numbers including the casting number and date code on the back of the block. Those can help determine whether the engine date is appropriate for the vehicle production date. If something doesn't look correct then it's not.

If you are looking for Camaro parts be sure to check out the following:

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